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Jordan: Combat vehicles from Syria destroyed


Syria says vehicles did not belong to its armed forces after reports of strikes carried out by Jordanian fighter jets.

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Jordan: Combat vehicles from Syria destroyed

Xi calls for new military ties – ecns


Chron.com Xi calls for new military ties ecns President Xi Jinping on Wednesday called on China and the US to build a new model of military relations in a meeting with visiting US Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel. As an important part of Sino-US ties, military relations should be advanced under the … Hagel aboard, &c. National Review Online China-US military: agree to disagree CCTV Hagel: Russia Causing Itself Long-Term Harm With Ukraine Steps KUTV 2News Washington Examiner  - South China Morning Post all 81 news articles »

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Xi calls for new military ties – ecns

Finland’s PM Katainen to step down, eyeing EU posts – Reuters


Irish Independent Finland's PM Katainen to step down, eyeing EU posts Reuters HELSINKI (Reuters) – Finnish Prime Minister Jyrki Katainen announced on Saturday that he was stepping down in June with a view to taking a senior European Union post, a move that could further unsettle a coalition government that last month lost one of its … Finland's conservative leader Jyrki Katainen to step down as prime minister … Fox News all 39 news articles »

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Finland’s PM Katainen to step down, eyeing EU posts – Reuters

Japan quietly deploys destroyer in response to N. Korea’s missile launch – Asahi Shimbun


Washington Post Japan quietly deploys destroyer in response to N. Korea's missile launch Asahi Shimbun Japan sent a Maritime Self-Defense Force Aegis destroyer to patrol the Sea of Japan on April 3 in response to North Korea's launch of two Rodong medium-range ballistic missiles on March 26. Although Defense Minister Itsunori Onodera ordered the SDF to … N. Korea: US 'hell-bent on regime change' USA TODAY Japan to strike any new North Korea missile launches Arirang News N. Korea says US 'hell-bent on regime change' Washington Post Reuters all 182 news articles »

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Japan quietly deploys destroyer in response to N. Korea’s missile launch – Asahi Shimbun

How slime mold can design transportation networks and maybe even transform computing


The yellow blobs of slime mold normally grow in dark forests, not on computer chips or on gelatinous squares shaped like the United States. But through his research, University of the West of England professor Andrew Adamatzky has shown that the mold can, and should, be grown elsewhere because of its potential in computing. Physarum polycephalum is a brainless mold that’s sole purpose is to build transportation networks for the nutrients that sustain it. As it expands in search of food, it sends out slimy tubes that continue to branch out until it finds a food source, at which point it forms a blob around the nutrients. Its slime tubes then continue to grow and split until the mold forms a network of tubes to transport the food throughout itself. The key to Physarum polycephalum’s computing power, however, is its ability to form the most efficient and optimal network. Nature’s urban planners Adamatzky first used the slime mold to map British motorways in 2009 —  showing that the M6/M74 should’ve been routed through Newcastle (if the mold was the designer). In 2010, Japanese scientists also proved that the slime mold could be used to model the rail system in Tokyo . Since then, Adamatzky has used the mold’s networking ability to model transportation networks throughout the world, and also bring the mold into the world of computing. Physarum polycephalum, a type of slime mold, creates an optimized model of Canada’s transportation network. Photo from: Adamatzky A., Akl S. Trans-Canada Slimeways: Slime Mould Imitates the Canadian Transport Network. IJNCR 2(4):31-46 (2011) To create the models — in this case for the U.S. — Adamatzky placed oat flakes on the 20 most populated urban areas and then started the slime mold in New York. You can watch below as the mold spreads itself over the agar, a gelatinous substance derived from algae that is commonly used in science labs, in search of food. While the video shows it happening in 46 seconds, the mold actually takes between three to seven days to form its network on about 4 inches of agar. It turns out that the slime mold agreed with most of the nation’s interstates. “We found that interstates 10 and 20 are responsible, at least from the slime mold’s ‘point of view’, for connectivity of the USA transport network: when these interstates are removed, the network becomes separated into western and eastern components,” Adamatzky said. Physarum polycephalum, a type of slime mold, creates an optimized model of the U.S. interstate system. Photo from: Adamatzky A., Ilachinski A. Slime Mold Imitates the United States Interstate System. Complex Systems 21 (2012) 1-20. Because it’s a self-repairing, living creature, it can also model emergency situations. So if a road was cut off due to flooding or an accident, the mold could also be suddenly cut off at that point and its resources redirected in another optimal way. “By understanding how living creatures build transport networks, an urban planner would probably modify their approaches towards urban development and road planning,” Adamatzky said. And while we may not see a petri dish of slime mold on an urban planner’s desk anytime soon, there are more practical applications of the mold when it comes to computing. Adamatzky wrote a book in 2010  where he defined the concept of Physarum machines: programmable, amorphous, living computing devices. Because the mold is sensitive to light and certain chemicals, the mold can be programmed to travel certain ways while still finding the optimal network. A slimy future for computers The network, like the transportation model one, isn’t limited only to nutrients. Adamtzky and fellow researcher Theresa Schubert have shown that the slime mold tubes can carry dyes and even conduct electricity. The mold acts like self-mapping circuits, complete with logic gates where the slime mold is forced to make a decision to get one result. It’s the same way a computer does logic, by taking an input and creating an output. In the case of slime mold, the logic gates can even be used to separate two colors of dye within the system before combining the two as a single output. Slime mold grows on a circuit board. In this picture, it is not conducting electricity, but it does show that the mold can grow on substances other than agar. Photo from Andrew Adamatzky Another use for slime mold would be turning it into microfluidic devices, which manipulate liquids on a very small scale and are used for things like delivering controlled-release drugs. “Indeed slime mold can transport only bio-compatible substances, but even with such limitations, microfluidic devices made of slime mold would find some applications in, for example, biological sensors or lab-on-chips,” Adamatzky said. In their most recent study published last week in Materials Today, the pair showed how the network can be manipulated to form logic circuits that don’t need electricity, are very simple and inexpensive to reproduce. Since the slime mold computers are self-growing and self-repairing, they could be used in anything from soft-bodied robots to hybrid wetware like devices used to detect certain molecules. “Ultimately, we can make an all-soft, self-growing and self-repairing computing device from the slime mold,” Adamatzky said. Correction: The article was updated April 5 to reflect that Adamatzky first published a paper in 2009 detailing the use of slime mold to map British motorways. Related research and analysis from Gigaom Research: Subscriber content. Sign up for a free trial . New trends defining the new business intelligence landscape Survey: How apps can solve photo management Cloud and data first-quarter 2013: analysis and outlook

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How slime mold can design transportation networks and maybe even transform computing

Transcend UHS-I Class 3 memory cards support 4K video capture


Transcend has announced SDXC/SDHC UHS-I Class 3 (U3) rated memory cards with read and write speeds of up to 95MB/s and 85MB/s. The Transcend cards meet requirements to give smooth video capture on new 4K cameras such as the Sony FDR-AX100, Panasonic Lumix GH4 and Canon EOS C500. Featuring 32GB to 128GB capacities, the new cards will available by mid-April in Japan and soon after in the U.S.  Learn more

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Transcend UHS-I Class 3 memory cards support 4K video capture

Daily Life: March 2014


For this edition of our look at daily life we share images from Indonesia, England, China, Peru, France, India, Japan and other countries around the world. — Lloyd Young — Lloyd Young ( 37 photos total ) Butterflies sit on the face of Isla, aged 6, in the Natural History Museum’s ‘Sensational Butterflies’ outdoor butterfly house on March 31 in London, England. The temporary attraction on the East Lawn of the Natural History Museum houses hundreds of free-flying, rare butterflies runs until September 14, 2014. (Oli Scarff/Getty Images)        

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Daily Life: March 2014

Fukushima Return: At Nuclear Site, How Safe is “Safe?”


For the first time since Japan’s Fukushima nuclear accident, some nearby residents are being allowed to return home. But experts say radiation hazard persists.        

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Fukushima Return: At Nuclear Site, How Safe is “Safe?”

Kiska wins Slovak presidential election – Financial Times


The Star Online Kiska wins Slovak presidential election Financial Times Robert Fico, Slovak prime minister, suffered an overwhelming defeat in the presidential election that would have cemented his political dominance, losing to businessman and philanthropist Andrej Kiska, according to preliminary results announced on Sunday … Consumer-Credit Pioneer Wins Slovak Presidency Over Premier (1) Businessweek Kiska Wins Slovakia's Presidency Wall Street Journal Slovakia: Andrej Kiska victorious in presidential elections euronews Xinhua  - Zee News all 217 news articles »

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Kiska wins Slovak presidential election – Financial Times