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At the Scene


In Stockton, Calif., 58 murders were reported last year, more than double the 24 reported in 2008. The city is considering filing for bankruptcy and has already laid off police officers. Photographer Matt Black documented some of the sites where these incidents occurred last year. Scott Thurm, Bobby White and Justin Scheck report on WSJ.com . Information on these murders was provided by The Record . All photographs by Matt Black for The Wall Street Journal. Mario Hinojosa Zendejas, 23. Dec. 14, 2011. Shot in his driveway in the 1800 block of Country Club Boulevard. Matthew Bosa, 28. Nov. 14, 2011. Shot while driving on Wilson Way near Harding Way. Joseph Cruz, 31. June 14, 2011. Shot on Sutter Street just south of Noble Street. Luis Palma, 44. Sept. 4, 2011. Mr. Palma, a cab driver, was shot at Lincoln and Washington streets. David Lewis Jr., 34. June 11, 2011. Found near California and Fremont streets. Michael Shelton, 30. Sept. 17, 2011. Mr. Shelton was shot Sept. 12 in a parking lot in the 1100 block of North Wilson Way and died five days later. Brandon Wilson, 2 months. Aug. 12., 2011. Died after an incident Aug. 1 in the 7600 block of Kelley Drive. Paris Jordan Jr., 28. June 25, 2011. At least five people were shot at a bar in the 2300 block of East Main Street. Micky Xiong, 31. Oct. 6, 2011. Mr. Xiong, a Domino’s Pizza delivery driver, was shot in the 300 block of South Sutter Street after a delivery. Juan Juarez-Martinez, 17. June 9. 2011. Shot in the 200 block of East Sixth Street. John Mozzetti, 24. Oct. 15. 2011. Shot while driving in the 700 block of Oak Street. Pedro Garcia-Rodriguez, 27. Oct. 21. 2011. Stabbed in the 100 block of West Worth Street. Brian Spivey, 21. July 19, 2011. Shot outside an apartment complex in the 2400 block of Delaware Avenue. Damien Braggs, 19. Oct. 21, 2011. Shot in the 700 block of East Park Street. Rachel Moreno, 49, and Juan Segura, 33. Sept. 12, 2011. Shot at South Hunter and West Jackson streets. All photographs by Matt Black for The Wall Street Journal.

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At the Scene

Morocco’s Aerospace Gambit


Over the past decade, leading aviation companies have built increasingly sophisticated factories in Morocco, as local officials hope this push into advanced manufacturing can attract more basic industries in its wake. All photographs by Jesse Neider for The Wall Street Journal. Leading aviation companies are building increasingly sophisticated factories in Morocco. Boeing, national carrier Royal Air Maroc and the French electrical-wiring company Labinal opened Matis, pictured, outside of Casablanca in 2001. The operation prepares cables for jetliners. A portrait of Morocco’s King Mohammed VI hangs over the entrance to the Matis plant. King Mohammed VI last March neutralized protests by offering a more democratic constitution and fresh elections, which proceeded peacefully in November. But for Morocco to remain calm, analysts say, it must create jobs. Matis staff prepares wires not just for Boeing but also General Electric Co. engines, Dassault Aviation SA business jets and even Airbus jetliners. The aviation industry employs almost 10,000 Moroccans who earn about 15% above the country’s average monthly wage of roughly $320. Morocco is betting that by leapfrogging into advanced manufacturing like aerospace and electronics, the country can attract more basic industries. To ensure aviation companies have qualified staff, the government and an industry group in May opened the Moroccan Aerospace Institute, or IMA. The vocational school is on course to graduate several hundred students annually. Within three months of the institute’s opening in May, roughly 1,200 aspiring students had delivered resumes to the front gate, and more had sent in applications, said IMA Director Annie Lagrandeur. The center is a partnership between the government, which contributed the land and buildings, and the industry group, Gimas. Its members organize and sponsor training, modeled on French standards, for their new hires. Students spend up to 10 months alternating two-week stints at IMA, where many live in dormitories, and on their new jobs. Le Piston Français, pictured, a French aerospace component producer, was one of the first contractors to arrive in Morocco. Director Vincent Fontaine said the company was drawn to Casablanca in 1999 by sales opportunities and government incentives, such as tax breaks. Here, workers at Le Piston Francais in Morocco. The plant has grown to 110 employees from about 25. All photographs by Jesse Neider for The Wall Street Journal.

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Morocco’s Aerospace Gambit

Finding Common Ground


In 2003, Ian Welch was on his first combat tour in Iraq. As his battalion waited to storm the Diyala Bridge and seize Baghdad, an artillery shell struck the vehicle behind him, killing two soldiers and knocking Mr. Welch unconscious. When he came to, he was disoriented. His vision was blurred. Blood dripped from his ears. He helped gather the remains of the dead before heading out to take the bridge. He returned to Iraq twice more on combat tours. Mr. Welch was later diagnosed with chronic PTSD and traumatic brain injury. He now lives in Dallas, Texas, with his girlfriend and government-paid caregiver, Katie Brickman. Every day, he faces the long-term effects of PTSD: bouts of amnesia, insomnia, anxiety, dizziness and vomiting. Photographer Brandon Thibodeaux spent two months chronicling Mr. Welch’s struggles. This is Mr. Thibodeaux’s account. * * * * * I’ve come to think of Ian’s way of dealing with PTSD as a protective moat–a barrier he crosses only for doctor’s appointments, haircuts and other necessary outings. When I was first assigned the story, I was planning on still photographs. But in the end we decided that the complexity of the story required much more, and I needed a different approach. I quickly learned that I needed ample time, as well as video and audio equipment to best tell Ian’s story. Ian is someone who rarely steps outside of his structured life, so it was essential to gain his trust. In the end, Katie, his girlfriend, was key. She acts as his protector, making sure to blunt potential triggers to his PTSD. Katie studied photography and knew of the work of Tim Hetherington and other war photographers. She convinced Ian The Wall Street Journal project could be therapeutic. Before I was assigned the story, I knew of PTSD as a combat disorder. After spending days with Ian and Katie, I learned of its long and tenacious grip on everyday life. I felt it only fair to reveal my own vulnerabilities since Ian exposed so many of his. As a teenager, I underwent chemotherapy for a rare case of lymphoma cancer. While I didn’t face enemy fire or lose friends in a battle, it gave us a patch of common ground. I faced attacks from my own body. And when he described his anxiety and mood swings, it stoked memories of friends I had met at the hospital. I often wondered why I was allowed to survive and they were not. Even Katie’s role with Ian was reminiscent of how my parents must have managed, juggling appointments and providing support. Once he allowed me access to his home, Ian, Katie, and I spent a lot of time together. It was important to become a part of his routine. Many days were quiet with little to photograph. Since Ian and Katie stayed up late, it made sense for me to stay overnight sometimes. To understand his deeper, more personal thoughts, I asked Ian to read his journals, and to describe what he recalled from the injury on April 7, 2003. I felt horrible asking to hear such difficult memories. One night, as we finally felt comfortable enough to go over his combat experience, I had to help him walk back into the house. Katie didn’t know how to react when she saw how weak he was. It was a powerful reminder of how difficult it was for him to revisit the most painful parts of his past. When the project was over, Ian was inundated by phone calls from loved ones. Katie couldn’t thank us enough for spending so much time with Ian and for capturing such an honest portrayal. Ian also talked about the project a lot and was more open to discussing his PTSD. I hope his story and video helps him hear those inner thoughts with better perspective. And I hope his story reaches and comforts others like him. * * * * * Below is the video Mr. Thibodeaux shot, produced by photo editors Matthew Craig (Executive Producer) and Kate Lord (Associate Producer). To read the story and see the complete interactive, click here .

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Finding Common Ground

Lives in India’s Lower Classes


India is trying to engineer advancement for its underclass through a vast and growing affirmative-action program. ( See related article )

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Lives in India’s Lower Classes

Lady Gaga’s Workshop


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Lady Gaga’s Workshop

Japan’s Field of Dreams


In tsunami-ravaged Rikuzentakata, Japan, baseball plays a critical role in sustaining families that have lost loved ones and are facing an uncertain future.

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Japan’s Field of Dreams

Withering in North Korea


Summer typhoons have compounded North Korea’s hunger crisis, as shown in photos taken on a government-monitored tour and released this week. All photographs by Damir Sagolj/Reuters

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Withering in North Korea

Scientists Fish for Way to Save Shiners


Scientists scoured the bed of the drying Brazos River in west Texas last week to rescue two species of rare minnows threatened by the summer’s scorching heat, drought and wild fires. Record-setting temperatures and lack of rain has eliminated the flow in this portion of the Brazos, endangering the sharpnose and smalleye shiner fish that make up an important part of the river’s ecosystem. All photographs by Brandon Thibodeaux for The Wall Street Journal.

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Scientists Fish for Way to Save Shiners